EN 1149: ARC Flash & Protective Clothing Standard

Home > Blog

EN 1149: ARC Flash & Protective Clothing Standard

en 1149 coveralls

Are you working in an industry that requires protective clothing? If not, it is quite possible that you have heard of BS EN ISO 1149. But if you have never heard of it, I will try to explain what it is and how it affects the work garments industry.

Table of Contents

What is the arc flash & protective clothing standard?

The BS EN ISO1149 arc flash&protective clothing standard is a European safety standard that specifies the requirements for protective garments and accessories worn by workers who are exposed to electrical risks. The standard includes requirements for materials, design, construction, and performance of the clothing and accessories.

The purpose of this standard is to reduce the fire risk associated with arc flash in electrical equipment and installations. It applies to persons who may come into contact with exposed live parts or conductors during operation or maintenance activities.

What is EN 1149 mean?

en 1149

EN ISO 1149 is the European Standard for protective clothing with electrostatic properties. This standard specifies the performance requirements and methods of testing for protective clothing with an electrostatic discharge (ESD) protected area. The standard includes both textile and non-textile materials.

The EN 1149-1:2013 standard applies to safety clothing which consists of a single layer or multiple layers of textile or non-textile materials that are capable of protecting the wearer from electrostatic discharges. It applies to all types of garments that may be worn by people in the industry, commerce, or services, including work clothing, leisurewear, and protective headgear.

The standard is based on EN 61340-5-1:2006, which has been revised to take into account the new requirements of Directive 2014/35/EU. The new directive states that all electrical equipment must be certified as ESD protected by a third-party certification body such as TÜV SÜD, UL, or Intertek Testing Services (ITS).

EN 1149 consists of the following different parts:

  • EN1149-1: measurement of surface resistance
  • EN1149-2: measurement of the electrical resistance through a material 
  • EN1149-3: measurement of charge decay
  • EN1149-4: garment test method
  • EN1149-5: performance requirements.

Explaining the different tests of EN 1149

There are several different tests that can be performed on materials in order to assess their EN 1149 compliance. The most common test is the surface resistivity test, which measures the material’s ability to dissipate electrical charge. Other tests include the charge decay test, which measures how quickly a material can lose its electrical charge, and the charge retention test, which measures how well a material can retain its electrical charge.

EN 1149-1 measurement of surface resistance

The standard EN 1149-1 specifies methods for measuring the surface resistance of textiles. The methods cover both direct and indirect measurement techniques. Direct measurement is generally preferable, but if this is not possible, then indirect measurement can be used.

The standard specifies two methods for direct measurement:

The method is based on electrostatic discharge (ESD), which measures the electrical breakdown at the surface of a textured sample under controlled conditions.

The method is based on corona discharge (CD), which measures the electrical breakdown at the surface of a smooth sample under controlled conditions.

EN1149-2: measurement of the electrical resistance through a material

EN1149-2 is a European standard that specifies the methods to be used for measuring the electrical resistance of a material. The most common method is the vertical resistance test, in which a voltage is applied to the material and the resulting current is measured.

This test method can be used to determine the resistivity of materials, including ceramics and metals, as well as to measure the quality of coatings on electrodes in electrolysis processes.

The standard covers three methods:

  • the vertical resistance test;
  • the horizontal resistance test; and
  • the square plate resistance test.

EN 1149-3 measurement of charge decay

The EN 1149-3 standard measures the charge decay of a material. This is important because it can help predict how a material will behave over time, especially in terms of electrical safety. Charge decay can also be used to determine the shelf life of a material.

The standards agency DIN has been developing the standard for years and has finally published it in its new form. The old standard was called DIN VDE 0871-5, which was published in 1998. The new standard has been renamed to EN 1149-3:2009+A1:2011 (30/11/2011).

The test method is based on IEC 60079-14:2006 (21/1/2006) and uses an electrostatic voltmeter to measure the charge decay of sample material.

EN 1149-5 performance requirements

EN 1149-5 is a European standard for electrostatic protective antistatic clothing. The standard EN 1149-5 was published in 1994 as a revision of the earlier standard EN 13501-2:1990 (now withdrawn). It has been updated several times since then: in 1999 (EN 13501-2:1999), 2003 (EN 13501-2:2003), and 2015 (EN 13501-2:2015).

The standard defines the requirements for electrostatic protective garments with regard to their electrical and mechanical properties. This includes, for example, the measurement of the surface resistivity, the dielectric strength, and the puncture resistance. In addition, the standard defines how these properties are to be determined.

The apparel industry has been developing in recent years towards more complex products with integrated functions such as flame retardant clothing or anti-static garments that can be used both indoors and outdoors. Products are increasingly being produced in accordance with this standard.

Certification requirements for the EN 1149 standard

To be certified to the EN 1149 standard, a garment must undergo several tests to ensure it meets the required standards for electrical and electrostatic properties. The garment must first be tested for surface resistivity, which must be below 10^9 ohms. The garment must also be tested for leak current, which must be below 0.5 microamps, and for charge decay, which must be below 2 seconds. Finally, the garment must be tested for resistance to abrasion, which must be at least 4 hours.

In the table below show the EN 1149 test method and minimum compliance vales

Test Methods

Description

Mini compliance vales

EN 1149-1

Electrostatic properties (surface resistivity)

Surface resistance is ≤ 2.5·109

EN 1149-2

Electrical resistance through a material

Electrical resistance > 105

EN 1149-3

Electrostatic properties (inductive charge)

t50 < 4 s or S > 0.2 values

EN 1149-5

Electrostatic properties. Performance requirements and material design

t50 < 4 s or S > 0.2 values; or surface resistance is ≤ 2.5·109

EN 1149 fabric tests methods

There are several methods of testing EN 1149 fabrics to ensure their quality and performance. The most common method is the use of an electrostatic field meter, which measures the fabric’s ability to dissipate static electricity. Other methods include using a high-voltage tester to measure the fabric’s ability to resist electrical breakdown and a puncture test to measure the fabric’s resistance to tearing.

There are several methods of testing EN 1149 fabrics to ensure their quality and performance. The most common method is the use of an electrostatic field meter, which measures the fabric’s ability to dissipate static electricity. Other methods include using a high-voltage tester to measure the fabric’s ability to resist electrical breakdown and a puncture test to measure the fabric’s resistance to tearing.

The standard covers several types of fabrics including:

  • Polyester/cotton blends (EN116)
  • Polyester/viscose blends (EN117)
  • Nylon/polyamide blends (EN118)

You also can check the detail of EN 1149 fabric tests methods in the below video:

Why it is important to choose protective clothing to meet EN 1149?

The EN 1149 standard specifies the requirements for protective clothing that offers protection against electrostatic discharge. EN1149 standard is important to choose when selecting safety clothing, as it ensures that the clothing will offer effective protection against electrostatic discharge.

Electrostatic shock is a sudden discharge of electricity caused by contact between two electrically charged objects. When the voltage difference between two objects is high enough, it can cause a spark to jump across the gap between them, producing an audible sound and visible light. This spark causes little damage to human skin, but it can cause major damage to sensitive electronic equipment.

When people are working with electronic components, they must ensure that they are not likely to cause any damage by accidentally coming into contact with these components and causing electrostatic shocks. The best way to do this is by wearing protective garments that provide an electric charge barrier between you and the sensitive electronic equipment you’re working on.

What is the difference between EN 1149 and EN 11612?

The EN 1149 standard is for electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection of electronic components, while the EN 11612 standard is for protection against heat and flames. Both standards are important for ensuring the safety of electronic devices and components.

EN 1149 describes the test methods for determining whether an ESD protective device has the capability to protect a component from damage caused by electrostatic discharge (ESD). The main purpose of this standard is to provide manufacturers with a method of testing their products before they are put on the market.

EN 11612 describes how to test and classify different types of materials for their fire resistance properties. It also describes how to test and classify different types of materials for their flame spread index (FSI). This document does not apply to materials used directly in firefighting equipment or used as materials in products intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres or atmospheres where combustion may occur under abnormal conditions.

Conclusion

All in all, it is essential that everyone involved in the safety and health of workers understand EN 1149 before working with chemical safety clothing. By understanding this standard, evaluating products for compliance, and ensuring proper training, users can ensure that products meet their expectations for protection and health.

Picture of Arlen Wang

Arlen Wang

Arlen wang is the author of Anbu safety, he is the manager and co-founder of the Anbu Safety network. He has been in anbu safety company since 2008, with a working knowledge of personal protective equipment, and several unique skills related to the PPE industry.

View All Posts

Visit My Profile:

Recent Posts:

Arlen
Custom Services for You

Your reliable supplier for workwear, safety shoes, and other PPE items

en_USEnglish
Scroll to Top

Ask For A Quick Quote

We will contact you within 1 working day, please pay attention to the email with the suffix “@anbusafety.com”

×

Hello!

Any inquiry click to chat on WhatsApp or send us an email to: sales@anbusafety.com

× Whatsapp us